Understanding Your Rights

Don't Give Your Rights Away! Call a Englewood Criminal Defense Lawyer

Every person, whether a U.S. citizen or not, has certain rights under the Constitution, no matter the seriousness of the charge they are facing. It is important that you understand these rights and how important they are to your defense. Exercising your rights can mean the difference between freedom and prison.

Miranda Rights

Everyone has heard of Miranda rights. Usually they are being read to someone on a cop show as he or she is being put into handcuffs. This law is based on the U.S. Supreme Court case of Miranda v. Arizona which determined that based on the Fifth Amendment, upon being placed in police custody, a person must be informed of his or her right not to make any self-incriminating statements.

As a result of this case, any person in police custody must be told the following things:

  • You have the right to remain silent
  • Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law
  • You have the right to an attorney
  • If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you

The first of these rights may be the most important, followed by the third. You have the right to remain silent. You don't have to tell the police anything. You also have the right to an attorney. That includes having an attorney present if you do choose to talk to the police.

Before you speak to the police or make any decisions that may threaten your freedom, call Alan M. Liebowitz, Esq., at (201) 340-9338. Having an experienced trial attorney who will aggressively defend your rights can change things to your advantage.

Work with an Experienced Englewood Criminal Defense Lawyer

Understanding your rights is key to your defense. If you know what you can and cannot say no to, a competent, knowledgeable attorney can help you by showing where those rights were violated.

Unlawful Search and Seizure

Unlike what many movies and television shows seem to portray, the police do not have the right to bust down your door or pull you over without probable cause. Police procedure requires that very strict guidelines are followed to protect the citizens of New Jersey from unwarranted abuse of their privacy. If a police officer asks to search your car or your house, you are allowed to say no and insist that they return with a search warrant. Alan M. Liebowitz, Esq., will help you enforce that right and will show how the police may have violated your right to privacy.

Contact the law office of Alan M. Liebowitz, Esq., LLC for your free consultation today.