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New Jersey doctor charged with sex crimes

The level of physical contact that a patient and his doctor have during a medical appointment can greatly vary. While some medical professionals only need to speak with their patients to discover ailments, others must undertake invasive, hands-on examinations to understand their patients' conditions. A patient may always discuss his concerns with his doctor if he is uncomfortable with an examination or treatment technique.

A New Jersey cardiologist is facing charges from two patients who claim his physical examinations involved inappropriate touching. The female patients allege that the male doctor fondled them during medical appointments. One of the woman claims that the touching occurred during a single appointment. The other claims she was fondled during multiple visits. The doctor is now facing criminal sexual contact charges for the allegations.

Allegations of sex crimes are very serious on many levels. A conviction on sex crimes can cause a person to lose significant rights and can cause a great deal of damage to his or her reputation. In this case, the doctor in question is a long-time New Jersey physician with an extensive history of pioneering cardiac treatments for the benefit of patients with heart problems. If they turned out to be false accusations the charges could still do damage to his medical practice, cause him to lose his license temporarily and ultimately harm the individuals who require his medical care.

The court will have to evaluate if this doctor is innocent or guilty of the charges brought against him. As he prepare for trial, this doctor may see his professional life dissolve as patients and acquaintances select against using his services. Sex crimes carry with them a heavy stigma that often lingers even when an acquittal is achieved.

Source: NorthJersey.com, "Hawthorne cardiologist accused of fondling patients," Barbara Williams, April 24, 2014

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